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Saturday, May 22

  1. page Group Members and Roles edited ... {steph.JPG} Stephanie Stevens - Personality Traits are NOT inherited {Tara.jpg} Tara Sp…
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    Stephanie Stevens - Personality Traits are NOT inherited
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    Tara Spekkens - Personality Trait ARE inherited - Introduction/overview
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    11:47 am

Sunday, April 11

  1. page Conclusion edited ... In order to come to an opinion on this topic some critical thinking must be accomplished. Firs…
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    In order to come to an opinion on this topic some critical thinking must be accomplished. First ask yourself what you are being asked to believe or accept. Determine what evidence is available to support the claim. Is there any alternative ways of interpreting this evidence given to you regarding personality traits? Is there any other evidence that could possibly help make your decision and finally what conclusions are most reasonable for you to believe? (Bernstein et al., 2008)
    This Wiki has looked at theorists and researchers who believed personality traits were inherited and theorists who believed they were not. There has been compelling evidence shown supporting both sides of this continuing debate.
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    to a descisiondecision on one
    To sum it up, we believe, based on our research and readings, that we are born with the raw materials of our individual mix of personality traits and the environment in which we are brought up in determines the expression of those inherent traits.
    nature and nuture-nurture- its a
    We hope you have found this Wiki both comprehensive as well as informative. We further hope it was entertaining and that we made you think about what it is that made you...YOU!
    Check out this link to a funny song about personality traits.
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  2. page Charles Horton Cooley's Theory edited {http://swc2.hccs.cc.tx.us/salinas/CharlesHortonCooley.gif} Charles ​Charles Horton Cooley's B…
    {http://swc2.hccs.cc.tx.us/salinas/CharlesHortonCooley.gif} Charles​Charles Horton Cooley's
    Best known for his concept of "looking-glass self". This is the theory that your self-image is formed mainly by the messages we get from others, and an each person’s interpretation of the messages they get. There are three components to Cooley's looking glass self and they are (1) envisioning how one's self appears to others, (2) imagining what others must think of one's appearance, and (3) developing self-feeling, such as pride or shame, from one's understanding of these perceived judgments by others (Soylent Communications, 2010). Almost everyone in the general public imagines how they must look to other people with their: actions, behaviours, attitude and how their actions change, or rebel, to the judgements they receive. A large portion of a person's personality is determined by how people have reacted to their actions, behaviour and appearance. This in turn shapes a person to be the personality they are as Cooley described in his theory (Morine, 2009).
    "The thing that moves us to pride or shame is not the mere mechanical reflection of ourselves, but an imputed sentiment, the imagined effect of this reflection upon another's mind." - Charles Cooley
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  3. page Charles Horton Cooley's Theory edited {http://swc2.hccs.cc.tx.us/salinas/CharlesHortonCooley.gif} Charles Horton Cooley's Theory ... …
    {http://swc2.hccs.cc.tx.us/salinas/CharlesHortonCooley.gif} Charles Horton Cooley's Theory
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    judgements they recieve.receive. A large
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    of a personsperson's personality is
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    behaviour and appearence.appearance. This in
    "The thing that moves us to pride or shame is not the mere mechanical reflection of ourselves, but an imputed sentiment, the imagined effect of this reflection upon another's mind." - Charles Cooley
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  4. page George Herbert Mead's Theory edited ... {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_ugQUGrg2Qo8/Sth_nJ2UXtI/AAAAAAAAAzs/sYgSySqjlY4/s640/georgeherbertm…
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    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_ugQUGrg2Qo8/Sth_nJ2UXtI/AAAAAAAAAzs/sYgSySqjlY4/s640/georgeherbertmead.jpg} external image georgeherbertmead.jpgGeorge Herbert Mead's Theory
    "The emergent event, which arises in a present, establishes a barrier between present and future; emergence is an inhibition of (individual and collective) conduct, a disharmony that projects experience into a distant future in which harmony may be re-instituted. The initial temporal structure of human time-consciousness lies in the separation of present and future by the emergent event. The actor, blocked in his activity, confronts the emergent problem in his present and looks to the future as the field of potential resolution of conflict."
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    explain why certiancertain people of
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    that a certiancertain set of
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    argues that with outwithout these problems
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    and an indiviualsindividuals behaviour is
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    of Human ExistanceExistence Theory is
    "History is founded on human action in response to emergent events. Action is an attempt to adjust to changes that emerge in experience; the telos of the act is the re-establishment of a sundered continuity. Since the past is instrumental in the re-establishment of continuity, the adjustment to the emergent requires the creation of history. “By looking into the future,” Mead observes, “society acquired a history”(The Philosophy of the Act 494). And the future- orientation of history entails that every new discovery, every new project, will alter our picture of the past."
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    reactions and inturnin turn shape our
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    and are effected.affected. Mead talks about how through outthroughout our lives
    Mead defined our capacity for these relationships as sociality. He then describes two modes of sociality
    (1) Sociality characterizes the “process of readjustment” by which an organism incorporates an emergent event into its ongoing experience. This sociality in passage, which is “given in immediate relation of the past and present,” constitutes the temporal mode of sociality (The Philosophy of the Present 51). (2) A natural event is social, not only by virtue of its dynamic relationship with newly emergent situations, but also by virtue of its simultaneous membership in different systems at any given instant. In any given present, “the location of the object in one system places it in the others as well” (The Philosophy of the Present 63).
    The forthfourth and final
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    of his theroytheory focuses more
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    to make decsionsdecisions and choices.
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    of the theroytheory discusses the
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    part by the these choices
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  5. page Julian Rotter's Theory edited Julian Rotter's Theory {http://psychlops.psy.uconn.edu/founders/Images/7.jpg} Julian Rotter argue…
    Julian Rotter's Theory {http://psychlops.psy.uconn.edu/founders/Images/7.jpg}
    Julian Rotter argued that cognitions, or expectancies guide behaviours and are all created by learning. He said that when a person decides to engage in a behaviour it depends on two factors 1) what the person expects to happen after they have done the behaviour and 2) how much the person expects the outcome to be or how much they will value the outcome. One example would be studying for a test, first, past experience says that if they study for a test they will learn the content and ultimately pass the test and graduate to get a job, and second, they place a high value on grades, education and getting a career. This meant to Rotter that behaviour is determined not only by consequences that Skinner called 'reinforcers' but the expectancy that particular behaviours will result in those consequences.
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    and punishments. ReseachersReseacher's noticed how
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    their own efforts,efforts; this means
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    forces are sucessful,successful, people are
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    that the sucesssuccess was the
    Research on different expectancies show that they are inter-related with different behaviours. When confronted with a personal problem, internals will work to solve this problem, whereas externals are more likely to see problems as being unsolvable. Also, internals are more likely to work harder, stay physically healthy and less likely to drink alcohol or if they do drink, are less likely to drink and drive. In students, those that are internals are more likely to be better informed about the courses they will take, including knowing what they will need to do to get a higher grade and as a result internals get better grades then externals (Bernstein, Cramer, Fenwick, & Fraser, 2008).
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  6. page Bandura's Theory edited Bandura and Reciprocal Determinism {http://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/february22/gifs/ppl_bandur…
    Bandura and Reciprocal Determinism
    {http://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/february22/gifs/ppl_bandura.jpg}
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    perception of sucesssuccess is largely
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    likelihood of sucess.success (Bernstein, Cramer, Fenwick, & Fraser, 2008).
    Bandura's Theory
    {Bandura's_theory.jpg} Bandura's_theory.jpg
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  7. page Bandura's Theory edited Bandura and Reciprocal Determinism {http://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/february22/gifs/ppl_bandu…
    Bandura and Reciprocal Determinism
    {http://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/february22/gifs/ppl_bandura.jpg}
    Bandura believed that people learning behaviour is affect through a triad of factors such as behaviour, your external environment and personal factors, such as: thoughts feelings and biological events. Each factor being affected by the others and in turn affecting the two other factors. This is what Baundura described as reciprocal determinism. Another important factor in his theory was the notion of what he called self efficacy, which is described as the learned expectation of sucess. This means that our efforts put towards success or our perception of sucess is largely determined by our belief of the likelihood of sucess.
    Bandura's Theory
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  8. page Personality Traits Are NOT Inherited edited ... George Herbert Mead 1863-1931 {http://web.lemoyne.edu/~hevern/narpsych/nr-theorists-photos/me…
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    George Herbert Mead 1863-1931
    {http://web.lemoyne.edu/~hevern/narpsych/nr-theorists-photos/mead.jpg}
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    existence that eludesalludes to the
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    our behaviours.
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    How We Become What We Are
    In the paper How We Become What We Are, Author Winifred Gallagher a psychologist, describes his interest in temperament and behaviour. He has many Pit Bull Terriers and was greatly interested in how temperament is a manner of behaviour and reflects back to someone’s personality- both biologically and hereditarily. Gallagher goes on to explain how his dogs temperament is the result of a cross bread between the English Bull dog and the English Terrier hundreds of years ago. This created a fearless, determined fighting machine in the nature side of things. In turn this dog requires a different sort of nurture then other dogs that have been bred for compliance. He explains how he cannot enforce harsh treatment since that will create a vicious animal but passiveness or neglect would create an uncontrollable animal. The psychologist describes many interactions with the aggressive type, with interviewing many criminal behind bars and comparing their attitudes and behaviours to heroes. He describes how psychopaths and hero’s are on the same path, both trying to see the unknown, map the world and make a name for them. He also states how ‘nurture is the best predictor of good or bad behaviour’ and compared this to his dogs and how nurture can turn out aggressive or passive Bull dogs. The author goes on to quote a psychologist, Lykken, who uses the same theory of nurture on children. He states,
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    In conclusion, Gallagher goes on in his paper to talk more about temperament and how it relates to humans both in nature and in nurture. The main point he tries to push to the front of everyone’s mind is that environment can be a major factor in determining someone’s overall personality. He does try to convey the point that genes do have some influence in someone’s predisposition, but environment has just as much, if not more influence on someone and how that person will turn out. More research should be done on the matter to see if it’s the factor of the environment or genes develops a personality and to what extent, so the author really tries to convey this in his writing using experiments and former theorists on the matter (Gallagher, 1994).
    {http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/06/32606-004-2C77968F.jpg} Charles Horton Cooley
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    in Ann HarborHarbour Michigan where
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    Most well knowknown for his
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    the America SocioogicalSociological Association, which
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    helped create numeousnumerous associations and
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